talks make investors nervous Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:06am EDT * TSX down 17.51 points, or 0.13 percent, at 12,875.67 * U.S. debt negotiations key to investor sentiment * Lower commodity prices weigh on resource-rich Canada index By Alastair Sharp TORONTO, Oct 15 (Reuters) – Canada’s main stock index slipped slightly in early trade on Tuesday, as nervous investors looked to Washington for progress on fiscal negotiations to avert a damaging U.S. debt default. Hopes of a deal rose after U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat, and his Republican counterpart, Mitch McConnell, ended a day of talks on Monday, with Reid saying they had made “tremendous progress”. “I suspect something will happen on the positive side (in U.S. fiscal negotiations) but in the meantime the market is very nervous,” said Irwin Michael, portfolio manager at ABC Funds. Commodities were broadly lower, pushing the resource-heavy Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index down 17.51 points, or 0.13 percent, at 12,875.67. It had opened in the black then fallen sharply in the first hour of trade before recovering somewhat. “It’s very thin, very volatile, and all eyes are on Washington,” Michael said. Gold miners were weaker, as optimism that U.S.

(Photo: Ryan Remiorz, AP) Air Canada SHARE 94 CONNECT 57 TWEET 1 COMMENTEMAILMORE MONTREAL Air Canada is in the doghouse over a spokesman’s remarks following the disappearance of a dog who escaped airline staff at a California airport. The company says handlers at San Francisco International Airport took the dog out of his crate on Monday after his flight was delayed and the pet either slipped out of his collar or broke it. Air Canada says the dog, an Italian greyhound named Larry, bolted and was last spotted about 5 miles from the airport. TODAY IN THE SKY: Your bookmark for the day’s most interesting airline stories The local CBS TV station took interest in Larry’s disappearance and says it asked the airline about its procedures after obtaining a statement about the incident. Instead, the station says it accidentally received an email from spokesman Peter Fitzpatrick urging his colleagues to ignore the inquiry and what sounded like a jab at the U.S. government shutdown. “I think I would just ignore, it is local news doing a story on a lost dog. Their entire government is shut down and about to default and this is how the US media spends its time,” the station said the e-mail read. Word quickly spread online, with many voicing their outrage over the company’s response. “If you ever fly with your pet, you might not want to choose Air Canada,” one wrote on Twitter. The airline addressed the controversy in a statement Friday. “Air Canada acknowledges inappropriate comments were made in response to a reporter’s follow-up questions for additional details regarding Larry,” it said. “However, Air Canada has been providing the best available information to media on this matter.

Canada Consumer Sentiment Falls for Second Week on U.S.

Statistics Canada reported Oct. 8 the nation ran a trade deficit of C$1.31 billion in August, marking the 20th straight monthly gap. Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz said Oct. 11 in Washington that Canadas growth has disappointed, the same day the central bank released a report that showed Canadian business investment intentions fell to a four-year low. We are behind where we thought we would be lets say a year ago, or even for that matter 6 months ago, Poloz told reporters in Washington. What we need is growth that is significantly above 2 percent to begin reducing the excess capacity that we have in the economy. Bank of Canada Senior Deputy Governor Tiff Macklem said Oct. 1 that Canada needs growth of at least 2.5 percent to absorb the slack in the economy. Economists surveyed by Bloomberg News this month dont expect the expansion to exceed that pace until 2015. Slowing Growth Canada has averaged annualized quarterly growth rates of 1.3 percent since the start of 2012, down from about 3 percent in 2010 and 2011, according to Statistics Canada data. Two other indicators that have suggested economic weakness over the past year — manufacturing sales and inflation — will be updated by Statistics Canada this week. Factory sales figures for August will be released tomorrow, with economists surveyed by Bloomberg forecasting a 0.2 percent gain. Canadas inflation rate, to be released Oct. 18, probably slowed to 1 percent in September, according to economist estimates from a Bloomberg News survey. Jobs growth has also slowed this year. Statistics Canada reported Oct.

Subaru Canada Introduces the 2014 XV Crosstrek Hybrid this November

Image available at: http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20131015_C9637_PHOTO_EN_32000.jpg Image with caption: “2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek Hybrid (CNW Group/Subaru Canada Inc.)”. Image available at: http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20131015_C9637_PHOTO_EN_32002.jpg Image with caption: “2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek Hybrid (CNW Group/Subaru Canada Inc.)”. Image available at: http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20131015_C9637_PHOTO_EN_31998.jpg @yahoofinance on Twitter, become a fan on Facebook Related Content Chart Your most recently viewed tickers will automatically show up here if you type a ticker in the “Enter symbol/company” at the bottom of this module. You need to enable your browser cookies to view your most recent quotes. Search for share prices Terms Quotes are real-time for NASDAQ, NYSE, and NYSEAmex when available. See also delay times for other exchanges . Quotes and other information supplied by independent providers identified on the Yahoo! Finance partner page . Quotes are updated automatically, but will be turned off after 25 minutes of inactivity. Quotes are delayed at least 15 minutes. All information provided “as is” for informational purposes only, not intended for trading purposes or advice. Neither Yahoo! nor any of independent providers is liable for any informational errors, incompleteness, or delays, or for any actions taken in reliance on information contained herein. By accessing the Yahoo! site, you agree not to redistribute the information found therein.